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Open 24/7, this retro museum features vintage advertising, “then” cutting-edge appliances, maps, catalogs, classic toys and more. Learn the history of the Lucky Cat and review the chronology of Coca-Cola cans. You’ll find even more at the Collecting section.

1960s Ad for Coca-Cola Progress Picnic Coolers

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These are very cool photos of a vintage ad for Coca-Cola Picnic Coolers made by the Progress Refrigerator Company, one of the most prolific manufacturers of coolers throughout the mid-century. The front and back of the ad shows an all-aluminum picnic cooler and the “New Steel Model” for that year—the A52 insulated with “Polystrene” (polystyrene).  

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The History of Pears’ Soap and Vintage Advertising

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Pears’ soap has a well-deserved reputation for being a high-quality soap. It also enjoys the notoriety of being the first mass marketed transparent soap. Originally billed as the “English Complexion Soap,” Pears’ soap has been a leading contender in the bath soap arena for more than 225 years. As enduring as the soap itself has

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Filed under: Retro Advertising Tagged with: advertising, brands, vintage signs

8 Rare Vintage Candy, Gum & Cigarette Vending Machines

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Modern vending machines were immensely popular during the ’50s and’60s. These “24 hour shops” dispensed all types of products, including household items (like razor blades) and school supplies (like pencils). The most active vending machines served up candy, cigarettes and soda pops. Here we feature some rare finds. Some of these machines were restored by

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1950s Coca-Cola Picnic Coolers & Stadium Vendors

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During the ’50s and ’60s, hundreds of different branded picnic coolers were produced. These metal coolers came in different sizes, and some featured bottle openers on the unit. One of the most popular brands emblazoned on these vintage coolers was Coca-Cola. Collectors of this line of coolers seek out specific variations in the text included with

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4 Awesome Vintage Juke Boxes

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We’re thrilled to show off four collectible jukeboxes from the ’40s and ’50s. Part of our own collection, some of these beauties were restored by Steve Hanson and Zuddie Smith, two of the best and most knowledgeable jukebox restorers in the US. Sorry, these items are not for sale! Instead, we share them as part of

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Filed under: Retro Museum Tagged with: jukeboxes, music

The First Little Orphan Annie Comic

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Created by cartoonist Harold Gray, the Little Orphan Annie comic stripped debuted in the New York Daily News on August 5, 1924. The strip featured the adventures of Annie, her dog, Sandy, and Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks. By the 1930s, Little Orphan Annie was one of the most popular strips across the US, and was ranked

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Filed under: Retro Museum Tagged with: Comics

The Princess Phone: Timeless Communicator

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During the economic boom of the 1950s, companies enhanced the design of plenty of practical products to attract new customers and inspire existing customers to upgrade. Bell System nearly missed its mark, finally introducing the Princess telephone in 1959. It would be Bell’s first real foray into widespread marketing, with a product created primarily for

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Cars, Radios & Appliances: How Powel Crosley Jr. Changed Industries

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The brand name Crosley is primarily associated with radios, but behind that vintage sound is a wealth of other product lines, many of which changed their industries. From automobiles, to the first refrigerator with shelves on the door, inventor Powel Crosley Jr’s life was filled with both failures and triumphs, along with many firsts. Born

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The Shelvador Refrigerator by Crosley

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By the early ’30s, Powel Crosley Jr had already built cars and radios. His foray into household appliances started with the Icyball, a refrigerator that was powered by kerosene rather than electricity. It was the Shelvador, though, that would make him millions, while an industry eagerly awaited its chance at the same success. The story

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